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    1. Top | #1
      azlan is offline
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      Why am I not improving?

      Hi guys, here is a question that some of us are quite familiar with. We are all too familiar of hearing players sobbing and complaining that they don't improve. They always complain about the same things, while the real reasons why they are not improving are left unattended. It happened to me when I was in my teens, and I am here to share some of the bad habits I did. There are certain things that have a lot of influence on most players improvement, but the 3 below are the most common:

      1.They choose inadequate equipment. The faster the equipment, the slower they'll learn to handle it, if ever.

      2.They do ROBOTIC practice drills, MORONIC exercises and SILLY practice matches with a wrong & biased mentality. Instead of working on their weaknesses, they work ONLY on their strengths. They play for winning on practice matches, and don't use them to practice.

      3.They choose the wrong practice partners by the wrong reasons. A partner can be adequate / inadequate for lots of different reasons.

      If you want to improve, instead of asking 'why am I not improving?' you could ask yourself 'how can I improve?' ('What am I doing that is making me improve?' and 'Does it really work?'). If you are not improving, your practice sessions LACK something. Spending hours at the table (playing / drilling) will probably make you improve, but when you have a somehow developed game, you need a lot of practice time to notice even a slight improvement. At this point, you need a partner (or coach) that forces you to play at your best, and to polish your strokes, footwork, tactics, whatever.

      What's more: finding a partner (just ONE) is no good, unless he's a very good player.What you really need is A WIDE SET of partners so you can hit with all of them. The more different his styles / equipment / personality / tactics / strengths & weaknesses, the better. You have to do FOCUSED practice: Improving a weak point is much easy and quick than improving a strong point. You have to work on your weaknesses:
      Some players have no backhand, and a pretty decent decent forehand - guess what are they training? they spend (let's say) 4 hours / week ripping forehands (which I was found guilty of). If they practiced 2 hours BH and 2 hours FH per week, they would improve A LOT his overall game.

      Inability to rally, to handle (play against) long pips / short pips / antispin / OX rubbers / reglued sponges, to push (yes - there are players than can loop but can't push), or to return serves are huge weaknesses that you can improve. Playing against your buddy, which is always feeding you with that CANDY balls (again, guilty..) so you can loop SO EASY will make you improve, BUT MUCH LESS than looping against that chopper at your club with those dangerous long pips, who will be chopping/feeding and floating POISONED balls to you.

      Which brings us nicely to practice partners , the Good Practice Partners (GPP) and the not so good ones or Bad Practice Partners (BPP):

      GPP : Is a constantly changing face. The more styles and equipment you play against, the better.
      BPP : Is always the same guy (unless he's way better than you -then you could be a bad practice partner for him-, or he's a good coach).

      GPP : Warms up all possible strokes / spins / placement / pace combination: Is not a one-dimensional player.
      BPP : Wants to FH to FH loop, all at the same pace for 40 minutes before doing another thing.

      GPP : Goes for tight rallies, or drills that allow to develop control and counter control, and forces you to think and take (tactical) decisions during rallies.
      BPP : Goes for robotic drills. (like 'OK. Now you loop 1 BH and 1 FH, and I'll block' crosscourt). Allows non-thinking, robotic playing.

      GPP : Is a player who (by ANY reason) gives you a hard time when playing matches.
      BPP : Is a player who you are very used to play against.

      GPP : Favors spin, placement and pace. He forces you to play for control. Makes you practice your footwork and play the ball.
      BPP : Favors speed (and not pace). He kills so hard when practicing, that you never have a chance to return (to learn to return) those balls.

      GPP : Should be able to surprise you with new serves.
      BPP : Won't let you improve your serve return once you are used to his serves.

      GPP : Plays an unusual, extreme or complex style as twiddling, penholders that BH-loop, choppers with offensive capabilities, unusual combination rackets... You should have some of those players among your practice partners.
      BPP : Plays an ALL to OFF style, (probably looping with inverted). This style is the most common, and it's the less likely to give you troubles, as you are (probably) VERY used to it already (& it makes me looks good )

      GPP : Has a destructive style of play, don't allowing you to play comfortable, BUT letting you rally - so you can get used to any spin, change of pace, placement, whatever.
      BPP : Allows you to play at your best, so you both end feeding each other with easy balls so you look like you could play.

      GPP : You play less matches, but they are much more intense and tight as every point is fought hard.
      BPP : Play tons of silly matches with you one after another. Matches can be won by any of you and by any result, as neither of you is trying hard.

      GPP : Is patient. He will feed you with progressively difficult balls so you can learn to handle those shots that give you problems.
      BPP : Don't like to pick up balls. He doesn't seem to understand that missing shots is part of the game

      GPP : Is an open minded, nice person.
      BPP : Can't win. Can't loose. Trash talks. Cheats. Judges other people. Thinks he can play (doesn't matter how good is he). Has 'TT prejudices'.

      GPP : Wants to play other players too.
      BPP : Is your TT buddy, and he only wants to play with you.

      GPP : Is a friend too.
      BPP : You see only at your club and with the sole purpose of practice TT (I used to get a lot of these).

      GPP : Gives advices. Show you his weak points, so you'll try to take profit of them, to force him to improve.
      BPP : Don't share his knowledge (like: he won't do his best serves except on the match has started). - How do you want to improve with a guy like this?

      GPP : Wants to play his weaknesses on your strengths / weaknesses, and viceversa.
      BPP : Wants to play his strengths on your strengths to have cool rallies.

      GPP : Tries to be a good partner.
      BPP : Thinks he is a good partner.

      These are some of my experiences, and honestly, they're not intended down talk anyone. I hope you enjoy reading them.
      To improve, we must enjoy the game and above all have fun



    2. The Following 6 Users Like azlan's Post:

      amr_tareef (11-10-2012),DanTheTTMan (06-09-2012),el gato (06-08-2012),ivandri (06-06-2012),judah000 (06-06-2012),TTANKEY (06-08-2012)

    3. Top | #2
      judah000 is offline
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      Thanks Boy

    4. Top | #3
      Matt Hetherington is offline
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      Very true in all cases we call the BPP selfish trainers
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    5. Top | #4
      Der_Echte is offline
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      A lot of USA players do not even have another player in the entire city they live in. Many have to drive an hour or many hours to even play a match. Most clubs in USA do not train. The club usually is borrowing space and there are too many players trying to play, so they are forced to do only matches. if anyone tries to train, they have 15 minutes or a "reasonable" time and have to yield the table. There are few full time TT centers even halfway properly equipped, but that is changing for the better, but slowly. The simple reason that the majority of players are remotely spread out and it is not economically easy or time easy to move for hours each way to do TT. Also, coaching costs an arm and a leg in USA. I decently skilled coach will charge anywhere from $40-$80 an HOUR for lessons. MANY of the coaches are for all intents and purposes a blocking partner who does not significantly raise the playing level of hte student, in fact has a cash incentive to prevent him from becoming an elite TT athlete. That fat cash per hour is good money. A 1500-1600 level player who gets 2-3 hours of coaching a week should be able to improve to 2000 USATT in a year or two no problem. Many of these coached USA players move up not so much in rating and develop only a good practive FH loop that is not so dynamic in a match. The players are tossing their cash into a money pit in this situation to the coach's exclusive benefit. Those who get coaching in USA are in the minority. These are the common reasons why many USA players never improve. This situation is slowly improving as there are increasingly more and more new proper TT facilities popping up in some places. The top to bottom improvement in our USATT top 100 within the last 4 years is a very good indicator.

      You touched on a lot of reasons why players with access to a club nearby enough and low cost enough do not improve. USA players have a deck stacked against them if the ones in these remote areas do not move to an area with decent TT infastructure, like say DC/Baltimore or Ft. Worth, or LA or where ICC TT Training center is at.

      I lived in a city with 100,000 population and was the only registered player in the entire city. The nearest club was 160+ KM away. i drove 100 KM once a week to hit for 2-3 hours hard to train as there was no way to contain the court and it was in the middle of a rec center with players moving through the courts. I was lucky to even maintain a rating, let alone improve it a bit. Looking back at those couple years I was in USA, I cannot even count it as time I played TT. I was essentially a recreational player who wanted to be a TT player. If I wanted to train, I would have had to drive almost 2 hours one way, pay club dues, pay a coach $40+ an hour, pay for food, and you can add it all up that that is too expensive and too time consuming to do with any frequency needed to improve much.

      Here in Korea where I live, it is a whole new world. A TT club is a 5 minute walk away. Both coaches are USATT 2450-2500 level. Club fees are cheap, like $50 a month for unlimited play 7 days a week 12 hrs a day. Lessons cost $75 for 3x 20 minute lessons a week in a netted off training area for single and multiball drills. We have a lot of players at all levels. You can train with anyone and you can also do matches. You can get advice from good players and also the coaches. Tourneys are everywhere in Seoul and teh surrounding region and cost $30 max for all events combined. You can visit other clubs to get a chance to play other styles and pay $5 for the whole night. You can do fun TT assn meetups with team round robins. You go to war with you club at tourneys. You can practice a wide range of stuff with a wide array of players to gain experience and correct things. You can have a lot of fun. You can do it all in a timely manner every day and at a very reasonable total cost. Public transportation is everywhere and clubs are every few kms in the cities.

      An evironment with a TT infastructure is a good change. An evironment without one is a total bummer.

      I see alot of the same stuff here in clubs you noted, but equipment isn't such a deal. the coaches are very good at reinforcing basics. many players go from total newbies to USATT 1700 in under 2 years. The ones who are more serious and ambitious obviously do much better than average.
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    6. Top | #5
      YosuaYosan is offline
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      Quality!
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    7. Top | #6
      azlan is offline
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      Thanx Yosua...

      I was essentially a recreational player who wanted to be a TT player.
      Der Etche, I really feel for you buddy. I didn't know it was that tough for you back in the US.

    8. Top | #7
      waldner4ever is offline
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      Well done Azlan...That is so true, and i got to admit i find myself soooo guilty of those candy ball but it is so tempting lol
      I have no complains here is the LA area...plenty of players, lots of pips player, some choppers, pretty good level for me

    9. Top | #8
      Mr. RicharD is offline
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      Wow Der Echte, you're a little behind the times at the moment. There are some phenomenal coaches in the U.S. at the moment. Many Provincial and even some former National coaches have immigrated here and the money is good no doubt about that, but the training is improving and more clubs are producing some top players. As far as Juniors go we have top ranked juniors in the top 10 all the time from 10 to 17 years of age. We've always produced some great Juniors, but as there is no future for them to make a comfortable living they don't pursue it. Our goals with North American Table Tennis and Joola are definitely to improve this option. As well as grow the sport. If you only have 8000 players competing you're not going to be able to raise your level of play. We have 20 million recreational players, but not nearly enough club players (in the 50-100,000 area) with only a mere 0.5% maximum (yes less than half of 1 percent) playing club match play. It's just plain numbers. Growth isn't about having the best coaches and the best facilities, although they do help the best way to grow the level of play is competition. Players are forced to come together and compete because if they don't they'll be left behind. It's what Europe is attempting to do at the moment. With the WSA and talks of a Chinese Facility in Europe it will provide the proper amount of growth to produce better athletes.

      If you look at some cross training and how good the U.S. is at producing athletes Table Tennis shouldn't be hard to produce world class athletes. The problem is the lack of growth and resources available to help those athletes. When you have an athlete that has a 40 hour + week job and fits in 3-4 hours of practice 5-6 days a week it's no wonder we have lower level players. But with growth there's more money and more resources available such as wealthy investors and philanthropists willing to create some growth in the sport. We had some great turn outs with the $100,000 prize money for the Hard Bat Classic. 1000's of entrants and many top players from the USATT joined. The problem is that too many of the entrants were recreational players who may be top dog in their basements, but just don't compare because they are uneducated when it comes to the sport of table tennis. This is all solved by growing the sport within clubs, cities, schools, and through media. It's something Joola has been doing for the past 5 years and we're going to be continuing it.

      So in response I would suggest everyone keep an eye out for the U.S. in the next 4-8 years. My hopes are to have facilities that will help our athletes to actually compete against world class players because I know our potential is seriously untapped.

    10. Top | #9
      YosuaYosan is offline
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      Quote Originally Posted by Mr. RicharD View Post
      Wow Der Echte, you're a little behind the times at the moment. There are some phenomenal coaches in the U.S. at the moment. Many Provincial and even some former National coaches have immigrated here and the money is good no doubt about that, but the training is improving and more clubs are producing some top players. As far as Juniors go we have top ranked juniors in the top 10 all the time from 10 to 17 years of age. We've always produced some great Juniors, but as there is no future for them to make a comfortable living they don't pursue it. Our goals with North American Table Tennis and Joola are definitely to improve this option. As well as grow the sport. If you only have 8000 players competing you're not going to be able to raise your level of play. We have 20 million recreational players, but not nearly enough club players (in the 50-100,000 area) with only a mere 0.5% maximum (yes less than half of 1 percent) playing club match play. It's just plain numbers. Growth isn't about having the best coaches and the best facilities, although they do help the best way to grow the level of play is competition. Players are forced to come together and compete because if they don't they'll be left behind. It's what Europe is attempting to do at the moment. With the WSA and talks of a Chinese Facility in Europe it will provide the proper amount of growth to produce better athletes.

      If you look at some cross training and how good the U.S. is at producing athletes Table Tennis shouldn't be hard to produce world class athletes. The problem is the lack of growth and resources available to help those athletes. When you have an athlete that has a 40 hour + week job and fits in 3-4 hours of practice 5-6 days a week it's no wonder we have lower level players. But with growth there's more money and more resources available such as wealthy investors and philanthropists willing to create some growth in the sport. We had some great turn outs with the $100,000 prize money for the Hard Bat Classic. 1000's of entrants and many top players from the USATT joined. The problem is that too many of the entrants were recreational players who may be top dog in their basements, but just don't compare because they are uneducated when it comes to the sport of table tennis. This is all solved by growing the sport within clubs, cities, schools, and through media. It's something Joola has been doing for the past 5 years and we're going to be continuing it.

      So in response I would suggest everyone keep an eye out for the U.S. in the next 4-8 years. My hopes are to have facilities that will help our athletes to actually compete against world class players because I know our potential is seriously untapped.
      You are consistent in your dreams and hopes, Richard. Good to see.
      I really wanna see the difference in US too.
      Lets see how US play table tennis 4 years from now.

    11. Top | #10
      azlan is offline
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      Aren't we all guilty of those candy balls they looked so yummy....

    12. Top | #11
      ttmonster is online now
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      Yousua .. Richard cannot go wrong , the reason is , the diverse population in US makes it easier to excel any sports given it captures the public's imagination. Hence, since Table Tennis is becoming popular now US is going to improve ... but may be not in 4 years ... you will have to wait for a few more years. Once the 10-11 year olds start reaching their twenties US will have players in the top 50 for sure.
      Only other thing I would like to see here is colleges promoting table tennis like many other games they do , Richard, if USATT can make that happen there is no stopping the budding paddlers ...
      Quote Originally Posted by YosuaYosan View Post
      You are consistent in your dreams and hopes, Richard. Good to see.
      I really wanna see the difference in US too.
      Lets see how US play table tennis 4 years from now.
      Lets go Spinny Looping !

    13. Top | #12
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      Thanks for that post!
      Everything of it is true!!
      Great work, thanks for teaching us :P

    14. Top | #13
      Der_Echte is offline
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      Azlan, That is how it was when I was in USA, but I have been in Korea the last couple yearsand am loving the TT here. There are some basement or 5th floor clubs who do not have a player over USATT 2000, but those clubs are pretty rare. Most clubs here have one or more coacher who were either former national players, were semi-pros, of TT athletes at middle/highshool/uni and were easily or currently USATT 2400-2500 skill level. A men's national player in Korea would be 2800 USATT minimum. In a city the size of 200,000 there would be at least 2 or 3 clubs. In a 500,000 size city, there are at least 10 clubs, all of them with full time coaches and at least 2 tables for dedicated training/lesssons netted off. You could air drop yourself from an airplane into the middle of any of these cities and find such a club within a 5-15 minute bicycle ride. or, you could get there the same time by city buss which runs everywhere all the time.

      Richard, I love you like a brother, but TT in USA is not even 1% like this in USA, YET. Yes, it is getting better, but let's be real. The YET part and the hope for it changing is where I agree with you. I am not behind the times at all. Unless you live right next to one of the few (but increasingly more) places where there is actually a TT club with even a 2000 level player as a coach and means to multiball/single ball train, your are screwed, blued, and tattooed, period. I know what is like on the ground in USA. Tell me or anyone living in these places what TT options they have besides investing a pile of cash one does not own and importing a 2400+ level coach, building a TT center that few will go to at the moment... If you are in Lawton, OK in USA, what are your options for TT? There isn't even another TT player in the city of 100,000 above USATT 1500 for the entire 5 years I lived there, they are all recreational players, if they even play. You could drive 100 miles (160 km) each way to the OKC club and hope their USATT 2200 player is there to coach you. Who is going to drive that distance and spend that kind of cash on fuel? The average USA vehicle (SUV) gets 25 MPG on highway, so that is 8 gallons fuel used on each trip for at least $25 USD per visit to the club. That is $75 to $100 per week on fuel alone and a LOT of unproductive hours going back and forth. The other option is to drive to a relatively TT-rich area, Ft Worth, TX, where there is Texas Wesleyan Uni, which gives out TT scholarships to USATT 2300-2600 level players. Great place to train, (and there are around 10 other great places to train in Dallas/Ft Worth area) but who will travel 160 miles each way? Can you really expect to get there in time to do any significant training, even if you get off work at 5 PM? No real good options for someone who lives there... yet.

      If you live in Killeen, TX, what are your options? A little better, but still damed expensive. Still $50 a week on fuel and a LOT of time on the raods to the Austin, TX club. You are 3 hours drive from Dallas area, so going there to train after finishing work at 5 PM if you are lucky enough to finish by then, is out of the question too far. A club built a new TT facility in Austin, TX (a city just over 1/2 million (a tad larger than my city with 10 full time clubs) (there is still only 1 sanctioned club in Austin,TX) that should be the example of success for an American club is the only other option, and a very good one. They did most of the building themselves to lower costs. About 16 tables, depending on how much room they want. Wood floor. Players of all levels. Coaching. Agressive programs to find new players and cater to them, so they do not become alienated like most US clubs. Tourneys. Club play. Close to where some of them live. Open 7 days a week. Open to late hours. Events for teens that go even later. This club builds TT from the ground up. Good place to play, if you are lucky to be close enough to them. Still need a car to get there though. Still burn up fuel.

      If you are in Kansas where TT retailer Cole Eli lives, you have to drive hours to find any TT action, so good luck living there. If you live in Springfield, IL, the capitol of the state, where will you go? You can drive a few hours to Chicago, but is that realistic for 3-4 times a week? No. You can drive a few hours to St Louis to train with the Yaos, but that is too far as well.

      If you live in Baltimore/DC area, one of the brightest TT hotspots USA has, you are still hurting a bit. You have several proper full time TT centers with high level outstanding coaches yet still need to do mortal combat with traffic to get there. if you go to the clubs that use community center space, about all you can do is matches, unless it gets real slow and you can partner up with a good player. These places that use community center space run 2-3 times a week, so you have to do a lot of hopping. if you live in D/C and want to train with Chen/Huang/Xaio/Hodges/(future Olsen) at MDTTC, then you are fighting a lot of traffic if you get off work at 5 PM just to hit a couple hours, then get back home. Who said TT is easy in USA?

      How many USATT 2300 level players do we even have in our nation? maybe 200? That is not enough to equip clubs in even ONE of our USA states. So, right now, it is not very good for TT in most places.

      Reality on the ground is still that it sucks rocks to be in 98% of USA locations for growning your TT game at a proper TT club, but there is hope for improvement, which the actual TT situation is doing for real. Just a few years ago, you could count on a few hands the number of full time clubs open 7 days a week with good coaches. Now, there are a lot more full time clubs, but still out of reach for the great majority of USA people. You simply cannot just walk out the door and get to a proper TT club within 15 minutes in USA, unless you built that club and live there.

      Still, there are more and more clubs like the one in Austin popping up, but there will have to be like 20,000+ more of them to pop up to make TT any bit economically feasable for anyone living in USA to get to a proper club in any reasonable time and train. That will take a very LONG time,if it ever happens. The biggest thing in the way of TT growth is our USA culture and that takes a lot of time to change. We have a lot of players who want to grow the sport and are willing to do a lot for the sport, but you have to have a market or create a market. That doesn't happen nationwide out of thin air right away. The environment for TT growth in USA is about as good as it has been in the last few decades, but TT will need to be adopted as a school sport everywhere to get the kind of reach and exposure it needs. That is happening right now in a few small cases (at the Uni level and some schools in the state of MN), but it is non-existant everywhere else. Perhaps the growth at Uni level with scholerships becomes a motivation for schools to grow programs. Once we get the schools going, our nation will begin to get on a roll towards having a many full time clubs, like 10 clubs per cities with a 1/2 million population and 25 clubs for cities with a million population. We have the best momentum for TT growth we have seen in decades, but we are nowhere near even the beginning of a solution to that end. yeah, We got a few great world class places for TT excellence, like ICC in CA, MDTTC in MD for example, yet we got such a long way to even make ONE club per USA city of 100,000 - 200,000 population, which at that density, would be considered a good start. We are nowhere near achieving that within the next 10 years short of a presidential declaration of TT becoming a mandatory school sport everywhere.

    15. Top | #14
      Der_Echte is offline
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      I addressed the situation how it applied to the average TT citizen in the last post. I discuss the elite situation here. I know about the situation with our country's best junior players and I know about the increasing trend of excellent foreign players coming to the States to open up training clubs or join an existing one. This is great stuff, an increasing trend that will continue to increase. Yet for TT to be accessbale to the average American, we will require tens of thousands of such clubs. That will not happen soon. The ability for a junior player who conveniently lives near an center with elite coaches and players like ICC, MDTTC, Lilly Yip, Y Fan, etc is much better than in past years and of course will get better, which of course will increase the chances of our country fielding players who actually crack the top 100 world rankings as adult players. I get that. I know we have a pile of rec players, which represents a lot of room to increase the competitve playing base. Our problems lie in our culture and next to zero money for being in this sport. The money will improve once we get more players on the scale of Basketball, which will not happen until we get TT made an official school sport everywhere. Once that happens, the companies who fund sporting events to raise there exposure will more and more allocate money to events. While there is hope and dreams, it will be nowhere near 1/2 achieved in the next decade. We may be able to get some more elite coaches in our country and make more noise on the international TT scene, but our sport will not develop 1/2 properly without a market. Making a market out of current environment will take a lot more time. All our other major sports started on the grassroots level and took decades to develop, so will TT. We have a LOT less particiapation and next to zero school involvement. That saps the market a lot. We have to build the market. That is happening. The signs of an increasing market are more and more elite coaches/players coming to USA. I still do not believe is we will not get to a saturation point where the average citizen in USA EVERYWHERE can get to a TT club within a reasonable time within the next decade.

    16. Top | #15
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      Hi Der_Echte,
      I came from Vietnam and i have been in the USA for more than 20 years.
      Firstly, the US is a big country and a diversity society. It's not like Vietnam or other smaller countries where everyone seems to share the same interest, same values, same goals,etc. In the US, people are interested in many different sports. The popular sports are the ones that can help people getting rich. The parents encourage their kids to learn some sports that can help the kids getting a scholarship in colleges. Tennis, basket ball, baseball, etc. among the popular sports. Not table tennis or badminton which are more for Asian and European folks. So, if the US behinds other countries in these sports, it's understandable.
      Secondly, even though Table Tennis is not a popular sport in the US, the TT facilities are everywhere. People can go to local colleges (community colleges), local recreational centers, public or private clubs. They're everywhere and cheap.
      I lived in many different states in the US including Alaska, Washington, Oregon, Arizona, and California. I used to play TT in colleges when i was in Seattle (WA). And now, i'm living in Southern California. I went to, let see, at least 4 different TT clubs in my area. (within 20 miles, less than half hour of driving by car). I even can play TT at my work (Boeing company in Long Beach, Southern CA). Our company has a ping-pong table at the cafeteria, and 3 tables at the Boeing Fitness Center. We have tournament every year. That's why i got involved into this sport even i'm not a pro like you.

      So, the bottom line is in the US, TT is not a popular sport (not until this current time and few more years) and it behinds other countries in this sport is understandable. The thing is people who are interested in sports, all kind of sports including TT, will find out that they have more chance/opportunity to pursuit their hobby or their sport career in this country than anywhere in the world. Why? because the facility and equipments are available to everybody. Let say, i can buy a very expensive racket about $350 without selling my kidney. Myself, i have 3 paddles and a set of table and robot at home. I couldn't afford to do that when i was a kid in Vietnam. (I even couldn't afford to buy a pair of sport shoes when i was in VN). And the most important thing is if you're good at sport (any kind of sport), you will be admired by many other classmates, collegues, friends, etc. around you. And you can make money if you're really good at something. In my case, my TT coach is a Korean man who can't speak English, but he can earn $35/session/person. Well, maybe he can't be rich but it's not too bad for just a local club coach.

      The thing is it takes time to get used to the life in the US. Some people adapt quickly, some not.
      Once you feel at home, you will find out that in the US, it has everything. EVERYTHING.

      Have a good day!

    17. Top | #16
      ducksick is offline
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      Great post Azlan.... Totally agreed with your statements.

    18. Top | #17
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      Soooo guilty hahahahahaha

      Thank you once again for the lessons sir Azlan, you have been a great contributor in these forum

    19. Top | #18
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      Thanx guys...I appreciate it. These are just some of the experience that I would like to share. Mistakes that I've done over the years, and mistakes that I would like you guys to avoid. Avoid these silly mistakes and you'll improve a heck a lot faster. I wasted years of my life with these sort of things hehehe

    20. Top | #19
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      Such a 'pearl' of a thread Az! I will be reading the rest of the post's soon...
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    21. Top | #20
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      Good ol' thread
      Worth bumpin haha..

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